Preclinical Studies II

Study 3

Objective: To investigate the hypocholestrolemic effects of an alcoholic extract of C. mukul and a pure steroid isolated from the extract in normal albino rats and triton-induced hyperlipidemic rats.

Methods: Normal rats: Eighteen male rats were divided into 3 groups. Group I served as controls (received saline), group II received the alcoholic guggul extract, and group III received the pure steroid. Blood samples were analyzed for serum cholesterol after 7 and 14 days.

Triton-treated rats: Hypercholesterolemia was induced in eighteen male rats by administration of an injection of 20 mg/kg body weight of triton. The rats were divided into 3 groups of 6. One group served as the controls, another was given the alcoholic guggul extract, and the third group was given the pure steroid. Blood samples were analyzed for serum cholesterol after 18-20 hours.

Results:

Figure 7
Effect of guggul and guggul steroid on the serum cholesterol levels of normal albino rats (mean values) .

 

Figure 8
Effect of guggul and guggul steroid on the serum cholesterol levels of triton-induced hypercholesterolemic rats at 18-20 hours (mean values) .


Conclusions: Both the guggul resin and steroid reduced serum cholesterol in the animals, but the steroid’s effects were more marked than the extract.

Study 4

Objective: To determine if C. mukul could reduce estrogen-induced hyperlipidemia in chicks.

Methods: Sixty male chicks were divided into 3 groups of 20. Group I served as normal controls. Group II served as estrogen-induced hypercholesterolemic controls, they received 4.0 mg/kg body weight of estrogen (estradiol) per day. Group III received 4.0 mg/kg body weight of estrogen (estradiol) and 3 g/kg body weight of gum guggul extract. Blood samples were analyzed for serum lipids, and the animals were sacrificed to study their organs. The experiment continued for 15 days (fig 9).

Results:

Figure 9
Effect of guggul extract on the serum lipid levels of chicks at the end of 2 weeks.4 (values are mean S.E.)


Liver and body weights of the guggul-treated chicks were much less than their estrogen-induced hyperlipidemic controls. Histological studies showed abnormal cells and follicles filled with colloidal substance in the estrogen-induced controls. Compared to the estrogen-induced controls, the guggul-treated group’s follicles were fully vacuolated.

Conclusions: The guggul extract was effective in reducing the serum lipids as well as liver lipids and body weights of estrogen-induced hypercholesterolemic chicks. The hypolipidemic action of guggul may be due to guggul's effect on thyroid activity.

 

 

 

"These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease"

 

Copyright © Sabinsa Corporation. All Rights Reserved